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Antimicrobial resistance and the threat of 'superbugs' recently hit the headlines. Researchers from DEC Oxford contributed to the paper which you can read in full below.

Blue petri-dish
Blue petri-dish

Lord Jim O’Neill’s global Review on AMR sets out its final recommendations, providing a comprehensive action plan for the world to prevent drug-resistant infections and defeat the rising threat of superbugs – something that could kill 10 million people a year by 2050, the equivalent of 1 person every 3 seconds, and more than cancer kills today. Building on eight interim papers, this is the final report from Lord O’Neill’s Review, established by the UK Prime Minister David Cameron in 2014 to avoid the world being “cast back into the dark ages of medicine”.

To read the paper, click here:

http://amr-review.org/

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