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Host a roundtable discussion with leading academics to discuss your challenges in developing vaccines, antimicrobials or AMR-relevant point-of-care diagnostics and medical technologies

Aimday

The National Institute for Health Research Community Healthcare MIC is supporting a University of Oxford meeting of academic and industry players to discuss solutions to industry’s most pressing challenges in the area of antimicrobial resistance.

The meeting will cover vaccines, diagnostics, medical technologies and antimicrobials and will draw upon the expertise of academics from across the University of Oxford including biological scientists, engineers and clinical researchers.

UK bioscience industry representatives with an infectious diseases portfolio are invited to submit their questions in advance, with the opportunity to discuss potential solutions with some of the UK’s leading academics.

Taking place on Thursday 4 July, the Academic Industry Meeting Day (AIMDay) is part of a series of innovative networking events that enable industry groups and other external organisations to set the agenda and gain academic perspective into industry challenges.

With small group discussion based on questions submitted in advance by industry, the workshop will give industry partners and researchers the assurance that discussions around AMR are of genuine interest. The meeting also provides the opportunity to gain fresh insights and meet potential collaborators.

With antimicrobial resistance now recognised as being on par with climate change in terms of its threat to humanity, immediate action is needed to cut the inappropriate prescribing of antibiotics in healthcare. Developing and implementing novel diagnostic solutions for primary care can support this, where 80% of antibiotics are prescribed.

Meeting co-host, the NIHR Community Healthcare MIC, leverages its clinical and academic collaborators to partner with industry and support the development and evaluation of new point-of-care diagnostic tools that meet a real clinical need.

The day includes a talk from MIC Director, Professor Chris Butler, Professor of Primary Care in Oxford University’s Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, followed by a series of face-to-face 60-minute meetings, networking and informal discussion.

For more information about the event, please contact amira.burshan@medsci.ox.ac.uk